Before your appointment

WHAT IS AN ULTRASOUND SCAN?

An ultrasound scan is a painless test that uses high frequency sound waves to create real-time images of organs and structures inside your body. Ultrasound can be used to investigate many different parts of the body including liver, gallbladder, thyroid gland, breasts, uterus or prostate. It can also show abnormalities in blood vessels.

IS IT SAFE?

There are no known risks. The procedure is believed to be absolutely safe.

WHO WILL PREFORM MY SCAN?

A radiologist or a doctor will preform the test.

BEFORE YOUR SCAN

For most scans, there is no special preparation required. Please continue with your normal diet and take your medication unless instructed otherwise.

If you are going to have ultrasound exam of abdominal cavity, urinary tract, prostate gland or reproductive tract, please, follow the instructions:

1. Ultrasound examination of abdominal cavity. You are asked to:

  • fast 6 to 12 hours before your ultrasound. This is because undigested food can block the sound waves, making it difficult to get a clear picture,
  • drink boiled water only, no fizzy drink on the day of your ultrasound,
  • avoid heavy foods and products that cause bloating and flatulence,
  • use one of popular antiflatulent remedies 2 days prior your ultrasound;
  • use a laxative but DO NOT try an enema.

2. Ultrasound examination of urinary tract, prostate gland(using trans-abdominal probe) or pelvis. You are asked to:

  • have a full bladder,
  • not to go to the toilet 2 hours prior you examination,
  • drink at least 0.5l of water if you cannot feel any pressure in your bladder 1 hour before your examination;

3. Doppler ultrasound examination of abdomen and/or pelvic area. You are asked to:

  • fast 6 to 12 hours prior your exam,
  • come after using the toilet,
  • consider using antiflatulent remedy;

WHAT WILL HAPPEN DURING THE PROCEDURE?

At the beginning of your exam you will be asked to lie on a couch and the lights will be dimmed so that the images can be seen more clearly on an ultrasound monitor. The radiologist or the doctor will move a small handheld sensor over the part of your body being examined. For ultrasound procedures such as transrectal or transvaginal exams that require insertion of an imaging probe, also called a transducer, the device is covered and lubricated with a gel. The sensor emits sound waves that when they hit an object, they bounce back as echoes of varying strengths. A computer converts the reflected ultrasound echoes into an image. The radiologist or the doctor will move the sensor around to obtain views from different angles.

HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE?

The ultrasound examination takes between 10 and 45 minutes, depending on which parts of your body are being examined.

WILL IT BE UNCOMFORTABLE?

There should be no discomfort during your ultrasound examination. Although if you have pain where the radiologist is moving the probe or have been asked to have a full bladder for your scan, this may feel uncomfortable during the procedure.

WILL I FEEL ANY DIFFERENT AFTER MY ULTRASOUND?

After your examination you will feel no adverse effects. You can drive and return to work.

MAY I BRING A CHAPERONE, A RELATIVE OR A FRIEND WITH ME?

Of course, you may bring someone with you. Unfortunately children are not allowed into the procedure room but our friendly stuff will look after them during your examination.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

If you have any further questions, please contact us and one of our team members will be more than happy to help you.

Before your appointment
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